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How to Make Tahini

Tahini, a nutty and creamy paste that is easy to make in a blender. Just make what you need. Buy sesame seeds in bulk and never worry about spoilage. Make creamy sauces, hummus or drizzle on veggies.

Sesame seeds in a bowl.

Tahini is fantastically versatile, its deep, nutty flavour a harmonious match with roasted vegetables, grilled oily fish or barbecued meat.

Yotam Ottolenghi

Tahini is a sauce or paste that dates back 4,000 years when it was known as sesame wine. It was used like an oil and has been a part of middle eastern cuisine ever since.

Raw sesame seeds were crushed to crack the hull and then soaked in water. The hulls sank to the bottom and the un-hulled seeds were scooped from the top. They were then toasted and ground into a thin paste.

Tahini can be served by itself as a dip or with the addition of lemon juice, garlic and salt as a classic middle eastern condiment. It’s great for drizzling, dipping and mixing into other recipes. I used this tahini for my garlic hummus recipe and my 6 ingredient tahini sauce recipe.

To make tahini, simply put at least one cup of toasted sesame seeds in a blender or food processor, add salt for taste and a little olive oil to help with the blending. I used 2 cups of sesame seeds, 1 tsp salt and 1/4 cup of olive oil. I used olive oil because that is typical in middle eastern cooking but you may use a lighter tasting oil such as safflower or sunflower. I used a blender and blended on high speed. It all came together in a few minutes. I filled up my half pint mason jar and stored it in the fridge. Tahini will last several months in the fridge and even up to a few years. You know it has gone bad when the oil in the paste goes rancid. Also, if there is any mold growing on it, toss it. I use the look, smell, taste method to see if a food item went bad. I look first, of course then smell. If I am still not sure then I taste. I also use the if in doubt throw it out method because food poisoning is for real.

If you buy sesame seeds in bulk then you can make tahini whenever you want. Raw sesame seeds last 6-12 months and can be refrigerated to last longer. Toasted sesame seeds last 1-3 years. You can buy raw and toast your own in a skillet or you can buy them already toasted.

Have you made tahini before? How did you use it? Share your experience in the comments below. If you make something with tahini, share on Instagram with #FusionCraftiness so we can all see.

Sesame seeds in a blender.
Sesame seeds in a blender.
Sesame seeds in a blender.
Tahini in a blender.
A bowl of tahini.

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Sesame seeds in a bowl.

How to Make Tahini

Yield: 1/2 pint
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 10 minutes

Tahini, a nutty and creamy paste that is easy to make in a blender. Just make what you need. Buy sesame seeds in bulk and never worry about spoilage. Make creamy sauces, hummus or drizzle on veggies.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups of toasted sesame seeds, see note below
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/4 cup of olive oil, may use safflower, sunflower or grape seed oil

Instructions

  1. Place seeds and salt in a blender or food processor.
  2. Blend or process on high, taking breaks to scrape down the sides with a spatula.
  3. Slowly add oil to encourage the seeds to blend, this takes a few minutes.  When you have a smooth paste with the consistency you like, store in an air tight container in the fridge.  Add more oil as needed.

Notes

  • If you buy hulled, raw seeds simply toast in a large skillet over medium low heat until they are golden brown and smell nutty.  Be careful not to burn it.
  • Tahini lasts 6-12 months typically in the fridge.  The oil will smell rancid when it goes bad.  If in doubt, throw it out.
Nutrition Information:
Yield: 16 Serving Size: 3 tbs
Amount Per Serving: Calories: 130Total Fat: 12gSaturated Fat: 2gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 10gCholesterol: 0mgSodium: 147mgCarbohydrates: 5gFiber: 2gSugar: 0gProtein: 3g

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Laura

Saturday 19th of January 2019

One of the reasons I don't make hummus is that I have to buy a big jar of tahini which I never use. I didn't know it was this easy to make. This is perfect, I can just make what I need. Thanks for this.

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